CUT-Style Tournaments

"CUT-style" tournaments are events for undergraduate college students modeled on a series of tournaments begun at Carleton College by its archivist, quiz bowl team coach, and former NAQT member Eric Hillemann.

NAQT Invitational Series are generally suited for collegiate play by novice teams, rather than by full-squads of experienced quiz circuit regulars. CUT-style tournaments welcome novice teams and more experienced undergraduate players--with a twist. To try to match team strength to the question level, an interesting eligibility rule is applied for the tournament:

  • Individuals ineligible to play in Division II at the SCTs may play only as part of a two-person team or as a solo team.

  • Individuals who have answered an average of 2.5 tossups per game played or better in any past NAQT ICT in Division I may play only as a solo team.

    (The statistic to determine eligibility is based only on tossups credited, regardless of interrupts. Thus a person playing 16 games in a past ICT in Division I must play solo if he or she correctly answered 40 or more tossups in that ICT. A person playing 15 games in a past ICT in Division I must play solo at CUT if he or she had 38 or more tossups to his or her credit.

  • Undergraduates whose first intercollegiate academic quiz competition as part of a college team came during the current season may play on teams of up to four players.

  • Undergraduates eligible for Division II play whose school did not earn an invitation to the NAQT ICT in either Division I or II in the past two years may play on teams of up to four players, whether they are in their first year of intercollegiate competition or not.

  • Undergraduates not in their first year of intercollegiate academic competition, whose school did earn an invitation to the NAQT ICT in either division in the past two years, may not play on teams of more than two players.

The original CUT tournaments were very successful and NAQT suggests that teams interested in running tournaments that cater to less experienced players without completely disenfranchising experienced players consider using the format.